Recipes

Bok Choy Salad with Fruit

Bok Choy Salad with Fruit

Makes Yield: 4-6 Servings | Source revised from Farmer John’s Cookbook

If you enjoy the tangy-sweet taste that comes from adding mandarin oranges, raisins, or chunks of apples to a salad, then you already know how delicious fruit in salad can be. In this salad, bokchoy provides a succulent base.

Ingredients

  • Your favorite brand of Poppy Seed Dressing
  • 1/2 cup nuts (chopped almonds or walnuts goes well)
  • 1 Tbsp. minced onion
  • 1 large bok choy, trimmed, stems cut diagonally into thin slices, leaves sliced into thin strips
  • 1 large sweet apple, peeled, cored, diced
  • 1 cup red or purple grapes, halved
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper

Instructions

  1. Toast the almonds in a heavy (preferably cast iron) skillet over high heat until they begin to brown slightly. Transfer the nuts to a bowl to cool.
  2. Toss the bok choy, apple, onion, and grapes in a large bowl.
  3. Pour the dressing over the ingredients; toss until everything is thoroughly combined. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Cover the bowl and set it aside at room temperature for 15 minutes to let the flavors develop.
  4. When you’re ready to serve, stir in the nuts. Eat just like this or use as a topping for your lettuce.
Italian Chopped Salad

Italian Chopped Salad

Makes Yield: 6-8 Servings | Source www.theharvestkitchen.com

This Italian Chopped Salad is a quintessential chopped salad that’s loaded with flavor and a delicious combo of ingredients. It’s great to serve with any Italian dish, grilled chicken or salmon, yet filling enough to be a meal on its own. Perfect for warm summer nights, backyard barbecues and potlucks.

Ingredients

  • Half of a small red onion halved through the core
  • 1 large head romaine lettuce
  • 1 medium head radicchio
  • 1-pint small sweet cherry tomatoes halved through the stem ends
  • 1 large cucumber, peeled and seeded then cut in half and sliced
  • 1-1/2 cups canned garbanzo beans, drained and rinsed
  • 1/3 cup grated parmesan cheese (or 4 ounces aged provolone, sliced into strips)
  • 5 peperoncini, stems cut off and discarded, thinly sliced
  • 1/2 cup kalamata olives
  • 1/2 cup Oregano Vinaigrette
  • Juice of 1/2 lemon
  • Dried oregano, for sprinkling

Vinaigrette

  • 2-1/2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
  • 1-1/2 tablespoons dried oregano
  • 1 teaspoon dried basil
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice, plus more to taste
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1-1/2 tablespoons minced kalamata olives
  • 2 tablespoons Parmesan cheese
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, plus more to taste
  • 1-1/2 cups good extra-virgin olive oil

Instructions

  1. Slice the layers of onions lengthwise 1/16 inch thick. Place the onion slices in a small bowl of ice water and set aside.
  2. Drain the onion and pat dry with paper towels before adding them to the salad.
  3. Thinly slice the lettuce and radicchio.
  4. In a large bowl, combine the lettuce, radicchio, tomatoes, cucumber,  garbanzo beans, cheese, , peperoncini, and onion slices.
  5. Toss to thoroughly combine the ingredients.
  6. Drizzle 1/2 cup of the vinaigrette and the juice of the lemon over the salad, then toss gently to coat the salad with the dressing.
  7. Taste for seasoning and add more lemon juice, or vinaigrette if desired.
  8. Sprinkle with extra oregano and serve.

Italian Salad Dressing

  1. Combine the vinegar, oregano, lemon juice, garlic, kalamata olives, Parmesan cheese, and pepper in a medium bowl and whisk to combine the ingredients.
  2. Set aside for 5 minutes to marinate the oregano and basil.
  3. Add the olive oil in a slow thin stream, whisking constantly to combine. You can also add all the ingredients to a glass jar with a lid and shake to combine.
Kale: How To’s

Kale: How To’s

Source Harvie.farm

Instructions

1. Rinse ‘Em
No matter where you got your greens—farmers’ market, farm stand, CSA—it’s important to rinse them clean of any dirt or (eek!) bugs that may be clinging on the leaves. Use cold water so they don’t wilt, and be sure to rinse them thoroughly. You can give them a rough chop if you’d like at this point, which will make them easier to work with later on.

2. Blanch ‘Em
Bring a large pot of water to a boil—no need to salt it as you would for pasta, or for actual cooking. You’re just taking the raw edge off. Once the water’s boiling, add the clean greens and use tongs or a spoon to submerge them completely underwater. The water temperature will drop, so be sure to keep it at a boil by covering the pot or turning up the heat. Let the greens swim around in the boiling water for about 30 seconds.

3. Shock ‘Em
Using tongs or a wire spider strainer, transfer the greens to a large bowl or pot of ice water. This should be cold, cold, cold—plain tap water won’t do. The near-freezing water will stop the greens from overcooking, and help them retain their vibrant green color. Let them swim around in the cold water, adding more ice as necessary, for two to three minutes.

4. Squeeze ‘Em
Drain the water and ice, and gather the greens in your hands. Squeeze out as much water as possible—really put some muscle into it. Excess water will freeze, coating the greens with ice crystals that will degrade the flavor and texture as they sit in the fridge. It will take a few rounds of squeezing, so consider it your arm workout for the day.

5. Pack ‘Em Tightly
Once the greens are pliable but dry, pack them very tightly into baseball-sized spheres, as if you were packing wet snow into a snowball. They’ll stick together thanks to the dampness, but try not to manhandle them too much.

6. Freeze ‘Em
Space the balls of kale, chard, etc., out evenly on a sheet pan, maintaining their shape but not allowing them to touch. Cover the pan tightly with a sheet of plastic wrap; this will keep them from collecting ice crystals. Place it in the freezer for one to two hours, until the greens have frozen partially. Doing this rather than dumping them all in a bag will ensure that they stay separate and don’t form into one big lump. This is helpful when you remove them from the freezer at a later date; you can just take out as many or as few as you need.

7. Package ‘Em
Once the greens have frozen partially, transfer them to heavy plastic bag; remove as much air as possible when you seal it. Store in the freezer, and remove the balls as needed. The balls are perfectly sized, so you never have to thaw an entire package (and waste half of it) again.

Riehm Produce Farm, LLC
7244 N. State Route 53
Tiffin, OH 44883
419.992.4392
riehmfarms@gmail.com